If your web site contains images of products, what is the best way to present those pictures? Is “click to enlarge” the only step to take for an alternative view?

Here are some ideas to jazz up your product images:

1. Get close up shots. If you sell boots, offer a way to see the tread. If you sell handmade jewelry, show the types of clasps.

2. If you sell earrings, do you offer it in a variety of hooks? What does it look like with different ones? Are there safety features for loss included? What do those look like?

3. Know your user. What if your prospect has had a bad experience with a certain hinge on a type of laptop? When buying a new one, they want to see close up shots of how your laptop brands are made. What do known weak areas look like?

4. Remove the cover! Machines with rollers, for example, never seem to have pictures of the insides. Show parts and how they are connected together.

5. Craftsmanship and talent should never hide behind a poor picture. We want to sense the feel of the leather or suede. If you sell boots with fringe, do you offer a video of the boot in action during walking? Your site visitor can not try them on and walk around the store. So, do it for them! A stiff suede fringe over a thin, flowing fringe may sell the boot if you show your customer proof.

Video vs Static Image

Do you offer video of products or static images?

1. What are the use cases? For example, if you sell products to buyers who buy in bulk and must get quotes and information up front for their managers, which do you think will help them the most? An email link to a video or a way to print out a picture for a faster view?

2. Videos are nice for how-to demos. If you make one, tell your site visitor what plug-in or software they may need, in advance of the download, to view it. Describe how long it is and add a call to action prompt to direct them to what you want them to do when they are finished watching your demo.

3. Take a static shot from the video to use as a call to action to get to the video.

4. If you are showing how to take apart or build something, get close up shots. Don’t film the product from far away. Your customer wants to experience it.

5. Offer a choice to your visitors. When it makes sense, offer both video and images, with different angles and close ups. This is especially helpful for higher priced items.

Many people have web sites that sell the exact same thing as the brand or manufacturer does. There are resellers and affiliates to compete with. If you rely on a cookie cutter template provided for you and other resellers are also using it, what are your chances of outselling them?

Let your product images work for you.

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Kim Krause Berg’s long background in web design, SEO and usability includes software application functional and user interface testing, accessibility, information architecture and persuasive design. She shared her passion for Usability and SEO through her site and private consulting at Cre8pc for 17 years. Kim founded Cre8asiteforums in 1998. In the fall of 2012 she sold her forums to Internet Marketing Ninjas and retired from private consulting to join their Executive Management team where she continues her work in usability testing, customer experience and conversions design.

My Online Course: Web Site Usability 101

Member:

American Society for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T)

Information Architecture Institute

Usability Professionals Association (UPA)